Cold Smoking can be used as a flavour enhancer for items such as salami, fish, chicken, beef, pork chops, salmon, scallops and steak. Usually Cold smoked Foods are baked, grilled, or roasted before eating. Smoking temperatures for cold smoking are typically done between 20 to 30 °C (68 to 86 °F). In this temperature range, foods take on a smoked flavour, but remain relatively moist. Cold smoking does not cook foods.

To do Cold Smoking successfully all year round, use an old working fridge and turn it on low when smoking. The Boss uses an old Shop double glass door Coke fridge that still works, it is ideal for smoking cheese or salmon on a hot day.  The cooling fan on the ceiling is usually taped over so it doesn't glue up with creosote, but if cooling is required, the tape is removed and the fridge is turned on low, smoke doesn't get on the blades much as it's blowing away and out the chimney.

Hot Smoking exposes the foods to smoke and heat in a controlled environment.  Hot smoking occurs within the range of 52 to 80 °C (126 to 176 °F). Within this temperature range, foods are fully cooked, moist, and flavourful. If the smoker is allowed to get hotter than 185 °F (85 °C), the foods will shrink excessively, buckle, or even split. Smoking at high temperatures also reduces yield, as both moisture and fat are "cooked" away. A can of water adds humidity to the smoker and helps smoke stick to meats. Apple Wood smoke is moist and adds moisture to meats.

COLD Smoking  penetrates entirely through meats (Pink smoke colour throughout).
HOT Smokingonly gets in outer layer (Red smoke ring colour in outside layer) most smoke is absorbed by the meat in the 1st 30 mins in Hot Smoking, as the outside layer gets cooked and goes firm, substantially preventing much more smoke from getting in. Here we suggest ways to Cold Smoke the meat, before finishing it off by cooking normally. The sought after 'Smoke Ring' or thin outside reddish layer is really the only meat that is smoked when 'Hot Smoked', the rest is just roast meat. 'Cold Smoked' meat is reddish most of the way through. Chickens look red raw when Cold/Hot smoked but assure the kids it is cooked as bones pull out easily! 
N.B. Cold, moist or marinated meats, absorb smoke better. 

The Boss normally cooks using the cold/hot smoke technique, he simply starts his big smoker with a handful of charcoal in the back corner using a hot air heat gun. When coals all white hot, he buries them in 1/2 shovel of Cherry sawdust, and cold smokes meat for an hour or two, the meat is entirely smoked and pink inside. He then adds charcoal and lights it all with the hot air gun and adds Wood Chunks on top of the charcoal to smolder, then Hot Smoke cooks it all for a few more hours.

Charcoal cold smoke BBQ method:-

½ fill a smoker can with our Sawdust, or Pellets. Heat up a piece of charcoal or a Heat Bead, red hot. Our Boss uses his hot air heat gun (for stripping paint etc.) to get a coal red hot. Drop the hot coal in the can and fill rest of can up. Place in Weber or hooded BBQ. Smoke food for an hour or so, without heat, then light normal pile of charcoal, and grill/Hot Smoke with lid on. An offset firebox with a small charcoal fire covered in wood chips or sawdust also works well. 

(The Boss also uses a Hot Air gun or Looftlighter to get the fireplace going in the house, it works like an old fashioned Blacksmith’s bellows. He’s mad though, when he burns off a big pile of branches or a big tree stump, he gets the leaf blower out and turns that fire into a flaming blast furnace. He also uses the leaf blower to dry off his big motorcycle)

Gas BBQ cold smoke method:-
Place a Smoker Box or homemade Tuna tin smoker can half filled with BBQ Pellets on the back corner of a gas burner or heat diffuser plate. Once can starts smoking, turn burner down to a point where the can continues smoking well, but only minimal heat is within the bbq. Smoke food for an hour with BBQ cover down. Later, turn on other burners and BBQ/Hot Smoke as normal.
See our Page: MAKE AN AUSSIE SMOKER CAN

Electric cold smoke method:-
You can use an electric hotplate or frypan on low, with wood chips or sawdust to create low heat smoke. Place in the base of a 44 gal drum of hanging meats, or food placed on racks, or in an old fridge, or a cupboard. BBQ smoker cooks are quite resourceful.

"Cold Smoke" Salmon:-
- Rub Salmon with Brown Sugar and Salt, cover with Glad Wrap and refridgerate 24hrs.
- Rinse off, cover, and refridgerate another 12 hrs until Crystals form on surface.
- This process 'cooks' the Salmon, now simply Cold Smoke for an hour or so. Voila!